10 Spoonie-Themed Gifts for The Holiday Season

I thought I’d put together a little something for those of you who are shopping for a spoonie this holiday season (or those of you who want to treat yourself to a little spoonie something!) It’s all in good fun! Here are a few spoonie themed gifts I’ve stumbled across 🙂

P.S. If you are wondering what the term “spoonie” means or where it came from, please check out “The Spoon Theory”

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5 Things I’m Learning in a Relapse

1.) The objective is to nurture and care for body in its suffering, not to “fix” it

What I’m learning most of all is our need to be compassionate with ourselves. Our pains and illnesses are our body sharing with that there is something disruptive going on inside, and it hurts. We need to tend to that cry, not panic and desperately searching for ways to silence the pain immediately. It’s like a hurting friend who wants to share their burden with you. Sometimes they need you to listen and respond with love. Because much as we want to fix it, we often set expectations beyond our control, search tirelessly (or more accurately, tiring-ly!) for the right treatment plan and cure, and find ourselves hurt and disappointed when that treatment plan doesn’t completely restore us to a state of complete balance and restoration. We end us putting more stress on ourselves than we had before rather than taking care of ourselves and keeping on our attention on how to soothe, restore, and heal our bodies. And sometimes, we even believe the lie that there’s something wrong with us as people rather than seeing ourselves as a whole people who are suffering with something out of their control. The objective is never to give up, or to stop trying new things, but to nurture, care for, and gently uplift the body rather than mute the pain.

2.) Rest is productive

This is a big lesson for a little sentence. How can we rest when we feel that little voice telling us that we should be doing something, working on something, achieving something? I’m learning that sometimes all it takes is a deep breath and the voice of love to respond with a plain and simple, “Rest is productive”. Oh, it is well with our souls. When our bodies and our minds are exhausted, swimming in pain, and just can’t find the strength to “do” something, pushing it our of pride will only deteriorate our wellness and set us back even farther. Rest is productive. Rest restores us. Rest replenishes us. Rest gives us a break from the hurry and the lies of success and reminds us of what it truly means. Rest lets us recuperate so we can be of true service rather than pouring out a watered down and weary version of our love and light. Rest gives us a break from the noise of who we should be so we can be refreshed again and reminded of who we truly are. And rest, my friends, rest is sometimes the bravest thing you can do, because rest is faith that life can be beautiful and dreams can come true right here, without striving to be someone or somewhere else.

3.) Reflect on and celebrate improvements, even the tiniest of them

This lesson is a fun one! How sweet it is to stop and celebrate the tiny steps forward and see how far they’ve brought us. It can be easy to look ahead, seeing how far we have to go or all the places we wish to someday be, but oh, how very important it is that we stop and reflect on all the wonder and love and recovery happening right here, right now.

4.) Everyone has a breaking point

It’s easy to think we “should” be able to handle more. It’s easy to be hard on ourselves or begin to grieve when we feel old symptoms resurfacing, have an emotional breakdown, find ourselves in an unpleasant mood, or return to a bad habit long conquered. But the truth is, we all have a limit to what we can take, and we all have a breaking point. It’s part of being human. We can only be pushed so far, and the perfect combination of stress can deplete absolutely anyone, sick or well. We all have a breaking point, a point where our bodies crash on us and can take no more. It’s nothing to be ashamed of, but certainly something to be tended to. It’s our bodies’ way of letting us know it needs some serious rest and recovery!

5.) Listen to your body lovingly

I think this last little lesson wraps the rest of them up. Listening to our bodies is key. Our symptoms will only get louder and louder until we listen to them, and we surely must do it with love and with a message of hope.

 

I hope these little lessons sit well with your soul if you, too, are in a harder time with your illness. Please feel free to comment and let me know what lessons you’re learning (or have learned)!

When You Feel Lonely

As September unfolds and brings a new season, and the chill of Autumn begins to touch our towns,

I hope you find yourself warmed by the sweet embrace of loving company.

And if your days feel cold with loneliness and isolation, I pray that you will nestle into hope.

I hope you find a moment of courage to lift your eyes and your heart just a little higher, in order that you may see the loving heart of our Lord, outstretched for you.

I hope you’re reminded that our lonely times aren’t really barrenempty, untouched times but pruned ones.

I hope you’re reminded that there is a coming Love more abundant than any we can imagine,

A Home where He will wipe every tear from our eyes, and there will be no more death or sorrow or crying or pain (Revelation 21:4).

If we can lift our eyes and our hearts a little higher than our hurts, even for just a moment, and look into the face of our Savior, we can trust He will comfort us with His mercy and teach us of His harvest.

Our gracious Savior is with us, Our God who places the lonely in families (Psalm 68:6).

I pray you will let Him draw near and whisper healing truth into your aching heart.

There’s so much joy ahead, friends. There’s so much joy around.

I hope this Fall season leaves you with little reminders of how all seasons will be redeemed;

I hope you let your worries fall away like the leaves of the trees.

You will grieve, but your grief will suddenly turn to wonderful joy. It will be like a woman suffering the pains of labor. When her child is born, her anguish gives way to joy because she has brought a new baby into the world. So you have sorrow now, but I will see you again; then you will rejoice, and no one can rob you of that joy. ~John 16:20-22

When You Feel Like You Can’t Make A Decision

When you feel overwhelmed by simple decisions,

When you can’t make up your mind on even the tiniest of troubles,

When the clock ticks and the minutes pass and you’re still no closer to a decision,

May you feel His gentle peace calm your soul.

May you understand your body’s message that it is exhausted and in pain with so little energy to spare for mental activity like decisions.

May you know there isn’t a harsh consequence to that.

May you take a step back and give yourself a calm space to recollect your thoughts.

Make you take time to breathe deeply to nourish your body with fresh air and sweet grace.

May you take time to rest to recuperate.

May you take the pressure off.

May you feel no shame in asking for help.

If the tears well in your eyes, let them roll down your cheeks.

It’s okay to release.

Just know that there is hope to light the darkness, there is peace to calm the raging fear, and their is grace to redeem each moment.

Rest well, sweet friend.

When You Feel Misunderstood

When you share your heart with someone who doesn’t yet understand your suffering,

When someone slips in a comment that wounds you deeper than they intended,

When you feel a pain stronger than you can express,

May you see God’s merciful hands outstretch before you.

May your heart find peace and safety in the One Who understands your pain not only because He’s carried you through it,

But because He’s felt it Himself.

May you be comforted by the One Who has endured every hardship, every heartache, every agony, all to hold you closer.

May you feel the empathy of the God Who loves you in and out, up and down, and every space in between.

May you feel the encouragement of the One who not only endured such pain, but conquered it.

May you know you are not alone.

So hold on to the ones that care deeply, and let them nurture your heart and soul.

And be patient with those who don’t yet understand.

For despite any hurtful comment they may utter, this truth sweet still remains:

Just because someone doesn’t understand, doesn’t mean your pain is any less significant.

May this truth soothe your soul.

Week Three: Your Illness is Not Your Fault

A few years ago, I came across a prayer blog for a captivating little girl named Daisy. Simply looking at her freckly little face instantly revealed what a bubbly, intelligent, unique soul was dancing around inside of her. It took one peak at a post about her to fall in love with that sweet little kindergartener. Heart warmed, spirits lifted, mind refreshed.

With great sorrow but even greater faith, her family shared that Daisy had been diagnosed with cancer. They shared updates about her grueling battles with the illness, along with very cheerful and touching stories about her life and vivacious personality; a personality as charming as they come! If Daisy’s life could speak for itself, I imagine it would speak with bravery and tenderness as it said, “Cancer is horrible, but life isn’t.”

Just a few days after Daisy was first diagnosed with cancer, her father gave a sermon at his home church entitled, “When My Heart Is Overwhelmed.”  This was the first time I had heard Britt Merrick speak, and it touched me in a way that I haven’t been able to forget since that day. He said many things in that sermon, but I felt one of the most powerful and influential things was this:

I will tell you that it takes more faith to endure Christ not healing your daughter than it does to see Him heal your daughter.

This is a truth that I pray warms and ignites in your heart in a way that changes your blame forever. Illness is not a punishment for a lack of faith. Illness brings an endurance, courage, hope, and belief in Christ that far extends the kind of faith that is only present when things are going okay. It surpasses that faith in lavish ways. When you face agonizing circumstances, God is not turning His back on you. God is reaching His hand and His pure heart out to you.

It heavies my heart to share that this year, Daisy passed away. Her family shared her memorial service on their blog, and it was a service of such deep faith and celebration of God that I cannot speak of it without tears of admiration. Daisy’s mother, Kate, walked onto the stage full of daisies with tears and courage both filling her eyes and shared words that I have held deeply in my heart ever since. She said that “Daisy’s faith in God was like a covenant, not a contract.” These words captivate me. A covenant faith; a faith based on promise rather than circumstance. This is what our illnesses give us an opportunity for, the opportunity to grow with God in a way that isn’t shaken by the sorrows of the world, but endures all things safely wrapped in His embrace.

I pray that this story will help you see that illness doesn’t fall upon us because we’re unworthy of good health. Illness touches the hearts and lives of people without consideration of what they believe or how they’ll handle it. Illness comes, and it breaks, and it steals, and it overwhelms, and it even kills, but it does not punish. We are under grace, and filled with it as well. Our gracious God doesn’t strike us down, but lifts us up. I pray that you will accept this bold truth, and let it dissolve the lies you’ve been pierced with for too long.

Your illness is not your fault.

{If you’d like to read the original post 5 Truths Your Heart Needs to be Reminded, please click here!)